Geological considerations for CO2 sequestration in a cratonic basin; an assessment of options in the Illinois Basin, USA

This chapter presents the distribution, characteristics, and potential viability of geological carbon sequestration options in the Illinois Basin that is assessed through a regional sequestration partnership funded. The most favorable areas for coal seam CO2 sequestration appear to be in the center... Full description

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doi: 10.1016/B978-008044704-9/50147-6
Authors:Finley, R.J.; Gustison, S.R.; Leetaru, H.E.
Volume Title:7th international conference on Greenhouse gas control technologies
Volume Authors:Rubin, E.S., editor
Source:Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies Conference, Vol.7, p.1339-1344; 7th international conference on Greenhouse gas control technologies, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Sept. 5, 2005, edited by E.S. Rubin, D.W. Keith, C.F. Gilboy, M. Wilson, T. Morris and J. Gale. Publisher: Elsevier, International. ISBN: 978-0-08-044704-9
Publication Date:2005
Note:In English; illus.
Subjects:Brines; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Clastic rocks; Coal deposits; Cratons; Geographic information systems; Information systems; Reservoir rocks; Sandstone; Sedimentary rocks; Sinks; Illinois; Illinois Basin; United States; Cratonic basin
Record ID:2020080788
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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This chapter presents the distribution, characteristics, and potential viability of geological carbon sequestration options in the Illinois Basin that is assessed through a regional sequestration partnership funded. The most favorable areas for coal seam CO2 sequestration appear to be in the center of the deep Illinois Basin, roughly coincident with the Fairfield sub-basin, where major coals such as the Springfield and Herrin coals are relatively continuous and lie below 290 m (950 ft) in depth. In places these coals are as deep as 370 m (1,200 ft). Major uneconomic coal resources, oil reservoirs potentially amenable to enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and deep, brine-filled sandstone reservoirs are all present in the basin as potential carbon dioxide sinks. Assessments of geological carbon dioxide sinks have emphasized the possible economic return from adsorption on deep, uneconomic coals with release of coalbed methane and from EOR with ultimate abandonment of carbon dioxide in the reservoir. Saline reservoir injection yields no economic product but may have greater storage capacity and greater certainty of containment than in coals or oil reservoirs. Integrated assessment of geological sequestration opportunities using geographic information systems (GIS) suggests potential areas where two or more carbon sinks may be vertically stacked.