Basin-scale modeling for CO2 sequestration in the basal sandstone reservoir of the Illinois Basin; improving the geologic model

A basin-scale model of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) in the basal sandstone of the Illinois Basin is being developed. This generation of the GCS model includes a new temperature profile, new brine salinity data, a new injection wellfield design, and revised geologic data. Modeling results indi... Full description

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doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.317
Authors:Mehnert, E.; Damico, J.; Frailey, S.; Leetaru, H.; Okwen, R.; Storsved, B.; Valocchi, A.
Volume Title:Greenhouse gas control technologies conference 12
Volume Authors:Dixon, T., editor
Source:Energy Procedia, Vol.63, p.2949-2960; Greenhouse gas control technologies conference 12, Austin, TX, Oct. 5-9, 2014, edited by T. Dixon, H. Herzog and S. Twinning. Publisher: Elsevier, International. ISSN: 1876-6102
Publication Date:2014
Note:In English. 16 refs.; illus., incl. sketch maps
Subjects:Cambrian; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Clastic rocks; Climate change; Computer programs; Fluid injection; Mount Simon Sandstone; Paleozoic; Petroleum engineering; Reservoir rocks; Sandstone; Sedimentary rocks; Temperature; TOUGH2; Upper Cambrian; Illinois; Illinois Basin; Indiana; Kentucky; United States
Record ID:2020050499
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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A basin-scale model of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) in the basal sandstone of the Illinois Basin is being developed. This generation of the GCS model includes a new temperature profile, new brine salinity data, a new injection wellfield design, and revised geologic data. Modeling results indicate that 100 million tonnes of CO2 per year for 50 years can be injected into the sandstone and permanently stored. Approximately 5,000 years after injection, the injected CO2 has not reached the caprock, but remains in the Mt. Simon Sandstone with 29% as mobile CO2, 56% trapped via residual trapping, and 15% dissolved in the brine.