Effect of geologic depositional environment on CO2 storage efficiency

The storage potential and movement of fluids within a formation is dependent on hydraulic characterization unique to each depositional environment. Storage efficiency (E), the ratio of the injected volume of CO2 to the accessible pore volume, quantifies the CO2 storage capacity in a geologic deposit... Full description

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doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.556
Authors:Okwen, R.; Yang, F.; Frailey, S.
Volume Title:Greenhouse gas control technologies conference 12
Volume Authors:Dixon, T., editor
Source:Energy Procedia, Vol.63, p.5247-5257; Greenhouse gas control technologies conference 12, Austin, TX, Oct. 5-9, 2014, edited by T. Dixon, H. Herzog and S. Twinning. Publisher: Elsevier, International. ISSN: 1876-6102
Publication Date:2014
Note:In English. 16 refs.; illus., incl. 9 tables
Subjects:Boundary conditions; Capillary pressure; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Depositional environment; Fluid injection; Permeability; Petroleum engineering; Pore pressure; Reservoir properties; Sedimentary rocks; Simulation; Storage
Record ID:2020050497
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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Description
The storage potential and movement of fluids within a formation is dependent on hydraulic characterization unique to each depositional environment. Storage efficiency (E), the ratio of the injected volume of CO2 to the accessible pore volume, quantifies the CO2 storage capacity in a geologic depositional environment, providing a means to assess the CO2 storage resource of candidate reservoirs. This paper quantifies the ranges for E via numerical modeling for eight depositional environments: deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. An important aspect of this work is the development of geologic and geocellular modeling that reflects the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Depositional environments were interpreted from core and geophysical log data; geologic and petrophysical data from oil fields and gas storage sites were used as constraints in the development of geocellular models, which were upscaled for flow simulations. Evaluation of the effects of geologic structures on storage efficiency indicates it causes a net increase in efficiency. Fluvial deltaic had the highest E and shelf carbonate had the lowest.