Illinois Basin-Decatur Project pre-injection microseismic analysis

The Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) is a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and storage demonstration project. Over a three-year period one million metric tons of CO2 were injected deep into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a deep saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin.... Full description

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Bibliographic Details
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doi: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.12.004
Authors:Smith, V.; Jaques, P.
Volume Title:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Source:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 54( Part 1), p.362-377. Publisher: Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ISSN: 1750-5836
Publication Date:2016
Note:In English. Based on Publisher-supplied data
Subjects:Arrays; Cambrian; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Downhole methods; Earthquakes; Gas injection; Geophones; Geophysical methods; Induced earthquakes; Microseismic methods; Mount Simon Sandstone; Paleozoic; Seismic methods; Upper Cambrian; Illinois; Illinois Basin; United States; Illinois Basin-Decatur Project
Record ID:2020024179
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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Description
The Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) is a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and storage demonstration project. Over a three-year period one million metric tons of CO2 were injected deep into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a deep saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin. This study examines the microseismic data gathered for the period from May 2010 to November 2011, which preceded the CO2 injection. Microseismic events are detected through permanent geophone arrays installed in two wells. A CO2 injection well drilled to the depth of 7236 feet (2205 m) is outfitted with a 4-component geophone array. Situated approximately 185 ft away (56 m), the 3502 feet (1067 m) deep geophysical monitoring well contains a 3-component geophone array. During the pre-injection period, a total of 7894 microseismic events were detected and 99% of these correlate with drilling and other well-related operations. Eight local microseismic events were identified that appear unrelated to well activity and appear representative of the background level of microseismicity. Regional seismicity was also examined by changing triggering parameters and producing a second dataset. Under this configuration, the system detected twelve regional seismic events that correlate to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) earthquake record, and approximately 1100 distant events are believed associated with quarry-related blasting operations.