Data integration, reservoir response, and application

The microseismic activity observed in and around a geologic formation undergoing carbon dioxide (CO2) injection is a combination of natural, or "background", microseismicity plus that activity which is induced by injection operations. Since injection pressure within storage target formati... Full description

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Bibliographic Details
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doi: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.12.020
Authors:Will, R.; Smith, V.; Lee, D.; Senel, O.
Volume Title:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Source:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 54( Part 1), p.389-403. Publisher: Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ISSN: 1750-5836
Publication Date:2016
Note:In English. Based on Publisher-supplied data
Subjects:Carbon dioxide; Data management; Earthquakes; Focal mechanism; Gas injection; Geophysical methods; Information management; Mechanical properties; Pressure; Reservoir rocks; Seismic methods; Simulation; Three-dimensional models; Illinois Basin-Decatur Project
Record ID:2020024178
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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Description
The microseismic activity observed in and around a geologic formation undergoing carbon dioxide (CO2) injection is a combination of natural, or "background", microseismicity plus that activity which is induced by injection operations. Since injection pressure within storage target formations are maintained safely below fracture pressure this induced activity typically originates at natural pre-existing zones of mechanical weakness presented by structural or stratigraphic features. The combination of mechanical properties and in situ stresses dictate the focal mechanism for microseismic emissions, an understanding of which facilitates the use of observed microseismicity for regulatory compliance and project management. Under favorable conditions microseismic activity may be unambiguously correlated with structural and/or stratigraphic features directly observed in seismic data, thus providing strong constraints to interpretation of observed microseismicity for focal mechanisms. However, in many cases, such as at the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project (IBDP), this direct correlation is elusive and other indirect support is required. Analysis of microseismicity at IBDP has been performed within the context of the integrated reservoir and mechanical earth models developed as part of the site characterization and monitoring program. The IBDP integrated modeling workflow involved continuous and geotechnically consistent data integration for geologic modeling, calibrated flow simulation, three-dimensional (3D) mechanical earth model, and coupled hydro-mechanical simulation. Using the coupled model, scenario-based forward modeling of microseismicity was performed for hypothetical focal mechanisms inferred from observed data. The experience gained at IBDP illustrates the importance of integrated modeling in the interpretation of microseismic activity for focal mechanisms and provides valuable insights into critical data gaps which could be the target of future basic research efforts.