Effects of reduction in porosity and permeability with depth on storage capacity and injectivity in deep saline aquifers; a case study from the Mount Simon Sandstone Aquifer

The Upper Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is recognized as a deep saline reservoir that has significant potential for geological sequestration in the Midwestern region of the United States. Porosity and permeability values collected from core analyses in rocks from this formation and its lateral equi... Full description

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doi: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2010.03.001
Authors:Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.; Barnes, D.A.
Volume Title:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Source:International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5(1), p.146-156. Publisher: Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ISSN: 1750-5836
Publication Date:2011
Note:In English. 39 refs.; illus., incl. 2 tables, sketch maps
Subjects:Aquifers; Cambrian; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Case studies; Cores; Fluid injection; Gas injection; Gas storage; Ground water; Mount Simon Sandstone; Paleozoic; Permeability; Porosity; Reservoir rocks; Upper Cambrian; Indiana; Kentucky; Michigan; Midwest; Ohio; United States; Mount Simon Sandstone Aquifer; Saline aquifers
Record ID:2020024163
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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Description
The Upper Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is recognized as a deep saline reservoir that has significant potential for geological sequestration in the Midwestern region of the United States. Porosity and permeability values collected from core analyses in rocks from this formation and its lateral equivalents in Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio indicate a predictable relationship with depth owing to a reduction in the pore structure due to the effects of compaction and/or cementation, primarily as quartz overgrowths. The regional trend of decreasing porosity with depth is described by the equation: φ(d) = 16.36 × e-0.00039*d, where φ is the porosity and d is the depth in m. The decrease of porosity with depth generally holds true on a basinwide scale. Bearing in mind local variations in lithologic and petrophysical character within the Mount Simon Sandstone, the source data that were used to predict porosity were utilized to estimate the pore volume available within the reservoir that could potentially serve as storage space for injected CO2. The potential storage capacity estimated for the Mount Simon Sandstone in the study area, using efficiency factors of 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%, is 23,680, 118,418, 236,832, and 355,242 million metric tons of CO2, respectively.