Geologic carbon sequestration in the Illinois Basin; numerical modeling to evaluate potential impacts

The Illinois Basin, a major geologic basin in the north-central United States, is a globally significant saline reservoir for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). To evaluate the feasibility of future commercial-scale GCS within the Illinois Basin, a basin-scale flow model was developed with TOUGH2-... Full description

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Authors:Mehnert, E.; Damico, J.R.; Grigsby, N.P.; Monson, C.C.; Patterson, C.G.; Yang, F.
Source:Circular - Illinois State Geological Survey, No.598, 71p. Publisher: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Institute of Natural Resource Sustainability, Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL, United States. ISSN: 0073-506X
Publication Date:2019
Note:In English. 88 refs.
Subjects:Cambrian; Capillary pressure; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Climate change; Computer programs; Data processing; Fluid injection; Greenhouse gases; Mass balance; Mount Simon Sandstone; Numerical models; One-dimensional models; Paleozoic; Permeability; Porosity; Pressure; Saturation; Simulation; Stratigraphic columns; Underground storage; Upper Cambrian; Illinois Basin; United States
Record ID:2020016550
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute.
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Description
The Illinois Basin, a major geologic basin in the north-central United States, is a globally significant saline reservoir for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). To evaluate the feasibility of future commercial-scale GCS within the Illinois Basin, a basin-scale flow model was developed with TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N simulation software and was refined as new geologic data became available. Geologic data obtained for the Illinois Basin - Decatur Project were used for this modeling project. Numerical modeling can be used to guide future efficient GCS development and to understand the potential consequences of such development. These GCS models included the Eau Claire Formation (caprock), the Mt. Simon Sandstone as the injection reservoir, and the underlying Argenta sandstone and Precambrian basement. For this project, the migration and fate of injected CO2 and the pressure changes in this open reservoir in response to hypothetical future GCS developments were assessed. Because of the uncertainty in the geologic and petrophysical data needed to build a GCS model at the basin scale, a series of simulations were developed rather than a single best model. The resulting family of six solutions provided a range of possible simulations and should be useful for developing basin-scale GCS in the Illinois Basin or other open basins. Model results showed that a maximum of approximately 5 billion tonnes (5.5 billion tons, or 100 million tonnes [110 million tons] injected annually for 50 years) of CO2 could be injected safely and permanently into the Illinois Basin. In many but not all scenarios, CO2 remained in the Mt. Simon Sandstone and never migrated up to the base of the caprock. In addition, the percentage of injected CO2 trapped by residual saturation, dissolution, and stratigraphic trapping depended on the geologic model and the petrophysical properties assigned. For example, dissolution could trap 8% to 61% of the injected CO2, as illustrated in this modeling effort. Finally, these modeling results demonstrated that some CO2 would remain mobile in the subsurface long after injection ceased, up to 5,000 years.