Identifying diagnostics for reservoir structure and CO2 plume migration from multilevel pressure measurements

Important to large-scale implementation of Carbon Capture and Sequestration is the ability to monitor the carbon dioxide (CO2) that has been injected underground. The focus of this study is to understand how flow processes during CO2 injection impact the pressure observed at a... Full description

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doi: 10.1002/wrcr.20285
Authors:Strandli, C.W.; Benson, S.M.
Volume Title:Water Resources Research
Source:Water Resources Research, 49(6), p.3462-3475. Publisher: American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC, United States. ISSN: 0043-1397
Publication Date:2013
Note:In English. Includes appendices. 35 refs.; illus., incl. 3 tables
Subjects:Aquifers; Boreholes; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Clastic rocks; Deep aquifers; Gas injection; Ground water; Hydrostatic pressure; Measurement; Monitoring; Observation wells; Plumes; Pressure; Reservoir rocks; Reservoirs; Sandstone; Sedimentary rocks; Testing
Record ID:2013081740
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute. Reference includes data from John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, United Kingdom
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Important to large-scale implementation of Carbon Capture and Sequestration is the ability to monitor the carbon dioxide (CO2) that has been injected underground. The focus of this study is to understand how flow processes during CO2 injection impact the pressure observed at a nearby monitoring well. In particular, we are interested in how the reservoir structure (layering and anisotropy) and CO2 plume migration influence the pressure transients at different depths. For a multilayered geologic model, four basic combinations of homogeneity/heterogeneity and isotropy/anisotropy conditions are examined. Numerical simulations using TOUGH2 show different CO2 plume migration and large pressure buildups in the storage reservoir and the seal for each scenario. Pressure buildups normalized to the pressure buildup at the depth of injection are diagnostic of the approximate height of the CO2 plume and provide information on the reservoir structure. Vertical pressure gradients normalized to the initial hydrostatic pressure gradient are diagnostic of reservoir structure soon after the start of injection. Over time, they provide information on the height of the CO2 plume. The diagnostic features in the pressure response are evident long before the CO2 arrives at the monitoring well and can be attributed to buoyancy induced and gravity segregated aqueous flows caused by the advancing CO2 plume. The identified diagnostics will aid in the ultimate goal, which is to develop a monitoring technique based on multilevel pressure measurements. Abstract Copyright (2013), . American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.