Monitoring CO2 injection for carbon capture and storage using time-lapse 3D VSPs

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the process through which a nearly pure carbon dioxide (CO2) stream is captured, separated from flue gas or other industrial processes, compressed, transported to an appropriate storage site, and injected deep underground into a geological formation whe... Full description

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doi: 10.1190/tle32101268.1
Authors:Coueslan, M.L.; Ali, S.; Campbell, A.; Nutt, W.L.; Leaney, W.S.; Finley, R.J.; Greenberg, S.E.
Volume Title:3D VSP
Volume Authors:Gulati, J.S., editor
Source:3D VSP, edited by J.S. Gulati and R.R. Stewart. Leading Edge (Tulsa, OK), 32(10), p.1268-1276. Publisher: Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Tulsa, OK, United States. ISSN: 1070-485X
Publication Date:2013
Note:In English. 8 refs.; illus., incl. 2 tables, strat. col.
Subjects:Cambrian; Carbon dioxide; Carbon sequestration; Clastic rocks; Gas injection; Geophysical methods; Geophysical profiles; Geophysical surveys; Monitoring; Mount Simon Sandstone; Paleozoic; Reservoir properties; Sandstone; Sedimentary rocks; Seismic methods; Seismic profiles; Surveys; Time-lapse methods; Underground storage; Upper Cambrian; Vertical seismic profiles; Illinois; Illinois Basin; United States
Record ID:2013080211
Copyright Information:GeoRef, Copyright 2020 American Geosciences Institute. Reference includes data from GeoScienceWorld, Alexandria, VA, United States, Reference includes data supplied by Society of Exploration Geophysicists
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Description
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the process through which a nearly pure carbon dioxide (CO2) stream is captured, separated from flue gas or other industrial processes, compressed, transported to an appropriate storage site, and injected deep underground into a geological formation where it can be safely stored for long-term geologic storage (Benson, 2005). Large sedimentary basins, such as the Illinois, Michigan, and Western Canadian sedimentary basins are good targets for CCS, as they are in close proximity to large CO2 emitters and are composed of the appropriate saline formations and overlying nonpermeable formations. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) created a nationwide network of federal, state, and private sector partnerships to determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future CCS in different areas of the North America (Office of Fossil Energy, 2013).